History and Heritage

From SMH, 29 June 1918susancWed, 11/01/2012 - 8:59am

North Arm Cove is a quiet little coastal village now but had some dreams been realised it could well have turned into a bustling port city. " The most central spot, where the new city is to be in the Great Port of the New Northern State. "

History
tonyhWed, 11/04/2018 - 12:38pm

Sunday 6 May 1918 is the accepted date for when the Port Stephens waterfront village of North Arm Cove began life as Port Stephens City. The celebrated Canadian Town Planner Walter Burley-Griffin designed this location & presented his plan to the Stroud Shire Council on this date 100 years ago which included a railway line, government administrative area ,a port location, all to be developed around his concept of circular roads surrounding important elements of the City , very much in the same way he had designed our National Capital of Canberra some 5 years or so, earlier ....

dougkSat, 18/11/2017 - 12:12pm

This is not a story about the army take-over of our peninsular. Those events are however mentioned in the book about our village – which is of course a great gift option for family and friends! Instead, this is a story about the past efforts of the local community to change the name of our village.

The two neighbouring villages to our east, Bundabah and Pindimar, bear names of Aboriginal origin. In 1983, the North Arm Cove community felt that our village too should be known by the Aboriginal name for the area: “Baromee”. But as...

dougkSun, 12/06/2016 - 11:13pm

The struggle for water access in North Arm Cove - including a community boat ramp and jetty - has been a long one which, until now, has always met with disappointment. For almost 50 years the Residents Association (which has over time also been known as the Progress Association and the Village Association) “water access” has been a recurring issue of concern.

Both the Walter Burley Griffin original and Henry F Halloran's subsequent early 20th century designs for "Port Stephens City" included multiple public jetties. Boat ramps in the early 20th century were not, of course, a consideration....

History
dougkSun, 16/08/2015 - 11:20pm

Names never count - said C.J. Dennis's Sentimental Bloke - But ar, I like "Doreen!" 

It is true that roses would still smell as sweet whatever you called them - yet knowing the correct name of a place or street when you are travelling can be quite handy.

Query
dougkSun, 09/08/2015 - 11:00pm

Did you ever wonder why ...
Some people spell Boulevarde with a final E
while
there are others who spell Boulevard with no extra E?

Can both be right?

Council, it appears, is confused because some of our local signs have the E at the end but most official Council records show no extra E. Indeed most Boulevards in the world go without an E to finish. Although Hawks Nest of course has "The Boulevarde"! That final E hasn't been washed away - yet.

History
dougkSun, 02/08/2015 - 9:35pm

As we continue to campaign for improved telecommunications in the Cove it is worth remembering that this local struggle began many years ago. But before relating a bit of that history here is a quick question:

How many permanent residents do you think would have lived in our North Arm Cove village back in 1968?

10? 20? 50? 100? more?

Review
janinerSun, 02/08/2015 - 9:05pm

Oysterman ‘The World’s Biggest Oyster Farm’ by John Clarke

“Oysterman” is a history of oyster growing in NSW with a focus on Port Stephens and the families that contributed to the industry.

David BensonFri, 13/03/2015 - 2:42pm

From 1826 to 1831 an area of salt marsh to the east of Karuah on Port Stephens was the scene of intense activity as in excess of one hundred convicts employed by the Australian Agricultural Company strove to turn it into viable farming land. The site was known as Number One Farm and the scheme was the brainchild of Robert Dawson the AA Company's first Chief Agent. It was a miserable failure.

Every day for around five years, convict labourers trudged back and forth along the three kilometres of road between Tahlee and Number One Farm where they dug...

mpicklesWed, 28/03/2012 - 10:11am

Cove residents who participated in the Koori walking tour on the 13 March found some surprising history unique to this area. ( Koori is the name of the people, Aboriginal is the name given by the English and means native).

The tour was provided by Buudja Murrang Indigenous Cafe and Cultural Centre and 15 Cove residents joined Aaron Taylor, Bill Callaghan and Tony . Aaron who led the tour lives in the cove and works for the Worimi Land Council as a Cultural Officer and in tourism with Sand Dunes Adventures. After introductions he began with a potted history...

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